Archive for the Back Pain Category

What If Sex Hurts? Interview with Sandy Hilton, PT, DPT

What If Sex Hurts? Interview with Sandy Hilton, PT, DPT

I recently interviewed Sandy Hilton for the July issue of BossFit Magazine on the topic of sex from a Pelvic Health perspective. You can find that story here (the entire issue is devoted to sex – check it out!) Sandy shared so much good information with me, and since the magazine articles are under 500 words I had to pare it down. I wanted to share the entire interview with you here. Enjoy! Tell us about yourself: I am a Doctor of Physical Therapy and have been practicing since 1988. I am the co-owner of Entropy Physiotherapy and Wellness, serving Chicago to restore hope and movement in those dealing with persistent pain, incontinence or painful sex. I serve as the Director of Programming of the Section on Women’s Health of the American Physical Therapy Association and am a member in several international organizations dedicated to providing top-notch health care. What are some reasons that men and women might find sex to be painful? Over 1 in 7 people experience pelvic pain and roughly 90% of those will have painful sex. There are multiple causes of pelvic pain in men and women. If it hurts in your pelvis, groin, belly, genitals or the hips during or after sex, you should see a physician for a good evaluation! Find a pelvic health specialist in your area, look for Urologists, Urogynecologists or Gynecologists who are experts in pelvic pain and sexual dysfunction. Common causes that we see in the clinic are related to stiffness of the muscles of the pelvic floor (those that you tighten when you do a Kegel), sensitive nerves in the area (from injury, repetitive use like long bike rides, following an infection or even sudden onset with no tracable cause), back pain and gut problems. Diagnosis like Vulvodynia, Dyspareunia, […]

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The Value of the Cost of Treatment

The Value of the Cost of Treatment

The Value of the Cost of Treatment This article http://wapo.st/187qp1A was shared on Twitter early this morning by physical therapist Justin Feldman (@JNFeldman), with the comment “A good argument for #cashPT.” As I clicked the link and saw the title, my heart sank. It said: For a stiff neck, nearly $6,000 in physical therapy seemed too much. The article was an op-ed from author, Chris Core, a commentator for WTOP radio. In it, he described his experience with physical therapy for his neck. Suffice it to say, he did not have a good experience. I have a number of thoughts after reading his perception of the experience, so indulge me while I share them. In my Pain Sciences course work with Myopain Seminars, we were told that “the pain is where the patient says it is, when they say it is, and it is as bad as they say it is, because it is THEIR pain.” (Once we come at it from that perspective, we can begin to shift their experience and emotions around the pain as we partner with them in treatment). So, working from that paradigm, I would like to say that Mr. Core’s experience with physical therapy was as bad as he says it was (because it was HIS experience). None of us know what happened in his evaluation and one subsequent treatment; but, he states that he was asked a bunch of silly questions and then given a massage and some exercises, and sent home. We need to appreciate his take on what he experienced. As a physical therapist, I ask the same “silly” questions of every new patient. I ask a lot of questions. Tons of questions that may seem irrelevant to the patient: “How is your sleep?” “Is the pain sharp or more of […]

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Thank you, Kate.

Thank you, Kate.

Why I love Kate If a picture is worth a thousand words, this picture is surely priceless. First, let me say that I paid no attention to anything surrounding Kate’s pregnancy or delivery. I rarely watch TV, and I ignored everything about this event in social media. Then this photo was released. And, now I must confess, that I love Kate. Why do I love her? Because she had the guts to greet the press for the first time post baby looking absolutely radiant, while making no effort to “hide” the fact that she had just given birth. She appeared in a beautiful dress with an empire waist; which if anything, highlighted the fact that she (gasp!) still has a belly. Although you wouldn’t know it from looking at any of the media surrounding most Hollywood stars departing the hospital, the fact is that MOST women still look pregnant after giving birth. Like 5 months pregnant. And it USUALLY takes 6-8 weeks for the uterus to return to its normal size. What Kate has done in 5 minutes is give permission to women to be proud of their beautiful bodies after giving birth. She made the effort to look beautiful (yes, we can argue that she most likely had a hairstylist, makeup artist, etc. work with her prior to the photo-op); but, the point remains that she did not attempt to cover up her abdomen with the baby, a blanket, a black dress, or Spanx. She owned the way she looked. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could see more and more women “owning” their look? Imagine a culture where we didn’t even have to have this discussion! A culture that recognizes that our bodies take time to expand to carry a baby, and time to become the post baby […]

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Foam Roller for Lower Extremities

Foam Roller for Lower Extremities

In this video Ann demonstrates a series of exercises using a foam roller. These can be done before or after your workout to massage and release tight muscles and fascia. Perform 10 slow repetitions of each exercise. You can adjust the intensity of each exercise by putting more or less weight through the area on the foam roller. no credit check lenders only This video is for informational use only, and is not intended to diagnose or treat an injury. Please discuss any new exercise with your healthcare provider prior to beginning.

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Let’s get to the point!

When I tell people that I can address their myofascial pain with many different modalities, including Trigger Point Dry Needling, they often get a funny look on their face.  The first question is usually, “What is dry needling?”  Once I explain it, they usually have one of two responses: 1) Let’s do it, I’m game to try anything that will make this pain go away! or 2) Uh, I don’t think so, I hate needles. Next Day Loans My hope is that the following information will answer some questions for the folks in group #2 and explain why the short term discomfort of needling goes a long way to eliminating the root causes of pain. As always, feel free to call or email with questions. Trigger Point Dry Needling Trigger Point Dry Needling is an effective physical therapy modality used in conjunction with other interventions in the treatment of orthopedic injuries with a component of myofascial pain and dysfunction. get cash within 1 hour What is dry needling?  A physical therapist with specialized post-graduate training uses Trigger Point Dry Needling as part of their treatment protocol with appropriate patients.  In the State of Virginia, a physical therapist utilizes Trigger Point Dry Needling when specified by the patient’s physician in their physical therapy order.  A solid filament needle is inserted into the skin and muscle directly at a myofascial trigger point.  A trigger point consists of multiple contraction knots, which are related to the production and maintenance of the pain cycle. When inserting the needle into the muscle, it is essential to elicit twitch responses, which are spinal cord reflexes.  The twitch response is both diagnostic and therapeutic, as it is the first step in breaking the pain cycle. Is dry needling acupuncture?  No, Trigger Point Dry Needling is based on […]

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